Return to Alaska Coin Exchange homepage

Return to ACCent homepage


ACCent: The Monthly Newsletter of the Anchorage Coin Club

ACCent Header


Membership Meeting 1st Wed. each month, 7 PM, Central Lutheran Church, 15th and Cordova

Vol. 20  No. 8


JOIN US AT THE MEMBERSHIP MEETING / SUMMER PICNIC
AUGUST 18th KINCAID PARK


 

HOT OFF THE PRESS

I started striking medallions here in Anchorage in December of 1990 in the lower level of the building next door to our current location. Prior to that, my dad and I would send designs down to a company in Idaho. They would cut the dies and strike the medallions there, then send them up to us to sell here. I think that my dad's first job was for Greater Anchorage Inc. for silver and gold Fur Rondy medallions. We then did projects for Anchorage's Olympic bid, and a few custom jobs.

1985 Alaska Mint Medal

In 1988, I designed an "Alaskan Medallion" with Mt. McKinley and 4 animals as a souvenir item to sell to visitors. I rented a Sidewalk Vender spot from the city on 4th Ave at F Street. This was a great location because I had a phone (there were 2 pay phones). I sold my silver medallions in deer skin pouches that I stamped with a map of Alaska on the outside. I also sold small gold nuggets, ivory carvings, and rabbit skins.

1989 Alaska Mint Medal

I did this on my off time from working at my Dads jewelry store, so I couldn't spend that much time downtown, but I new there was potential and that this was the place for me. I also went to an ANA summer seminar where we took a tour of the Denver Mint. During this tour, you could pay a small fee, push the button and strike your own medallion. My dad had wanted to start a mint up here, and after seeing this old press in action I thought "No problem".

I came home and found out about an old hydraulic press sitting in Seward So I called them up and negotiated the price. Then drove my pickup down and picked it up. This thing weighs about 4000 pounds, and sitting in the bed of my truck it was a long, slow trip home. I didn't want to go around any of those sharp corners too fast for fear of tipping myself over!

Mike Robuck with Alaska Mint Press

Unfortunately the press turned out to be one of the least expensive parts of setting up a private mint. It needed to be tooled for coining. I also needed an edge lettering machine, die polishing tools etc. It took several months to acquire and assemble all the equipment.

On the 12th of December 1990, we struck our very first medallions right here in downtown Anchorage!

.......Mike Robuck, Alaska Mint

 

THE PRESIDENT'S WORD

If you fly to Bermuda just to get the first strikes of their latest proof set...

You are probably a numismatist.

PICNIC

rain or shine we are covered
 12 O'clock, bring a salad

 

 

MISNUMICAT SCRAMBLE

This month:

RAGMON________________________

Last month's answer:

BROCK AGE: a coin struck without a collar to confine it to the standard size. The coin is over size and usually off center. It is a strike error.

 

 

BOARD MINUTES

THE CLUB WILL PROVIDE HOT-DOGS, HAMBURGERS, BUNS, CHIPS,

AND SODAS FOR THE SUMMER PICNIC. BRING A SIDE DISH SUCH

AS A SALAD OR DESSERT.

AND SOME THING FOR US TO SELL

AT THE DONATION AUCTION.

 

The board meeting was called to order at 7:30 P.M. by president Loren Lucason. The picnic august 18th and a coin show in October were discussed over dinner.

It was decided to have a drawing for prizes for the kids at the picnic where each kid gets to pick his prize from the ones on a table. The drawing for the raffle prize will take place after we eat.

The details of putting on club-sponsored coin shows were explored and the consensus was that there should be a per-table charge for dealers. With the cost of renting space for a show it started to look like we could only afford one big show a year. It was decided that the first step was to get a list of dealers who would pay a nominal fee of $25 to $35 per table.

 

START OF PICNIC AUCTION LIST

Two sets of 2003 P&D and 2004 P&D Sacagawea dollars in BU condition. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

Two sets of our club's 5th Year Commemorative Sets (1993). Both sets are numbered sets.

Two sets of our club's 10th Year Commemorative Sets (1998). Both sets numbered.

Two sets of our club's 15th Year Commemorative Sets (2003). Both sets numbered.

A set of various coin books made by Whitman and Dansco. Two are the children's type coin books (Roosevelt dimes and Canadian dimes). Three are the nice coin books (Jefferson nickels, Washington Quarter statehood quarters 1999-2003, and Lincoln cents).

Book: The Official American Numismatic Association Grading Standards for US Coins 6th Edition.

Book: Bill Fivaz's Counterfeit Detection Guide Handbook (autographed).

Four Redbooks: Various years. One of them is a 2007 Redbook.

Book: 2005 Standard Catalog of World Coins 32nd Edition 1901 to Present. Donated by Ponterio and Associates.

Book: 19th Century Standard Catalog of World Coins 1801-1900. Donated by Ponterio and Associates.

Some really, really old coin books and a US Mint Bag 1964 Lincoln Cent donated by Debbie and George Coon.

Various Coin auction catalogs. Donated by John Larson.

1800 half cent in fair condition. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

1848 Large cent in VG condition. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

1899 Indian cent in XF condition. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

1907 Barber Half with scratches in AU55 condition. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

US Mint 2005 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel set. Donated by Bill Fivaz.

Two sets of 2003 P&D and 2004 P&D Sacagawea dollars in BU.

SEE THE FULL LIST AT THE PICNIC