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ACCent: The Monthly Newsletter of the Anchorage Coin Club

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Membership Meeting 1st Wed. each month, 7 PM, Central Lutheran Church, 15th and Cordova

Vol. 21  No. 11


NOVEMBER 5th, 2008
MORGAN DOLLAR
AMERICAN CROWN TO CASINO TOKEN


 

RARE LAFAYETTE DOLLAR VARIETY FOUND

    It has long been know that there are die varieties for the Lafayette commemorative dollar. These varieties stem from the fact that only the key features of the designs on Lafayette dollars were cut into the hub. The hub is the master engraving from which dies are cut. The inscriptions and some minor features were separately cut into each die. Only 50,026 coins were struck so the mint may have thought this not going to be a problem.

    Until recently only 3 obverse dies (designated 1 to 3), and 4 reverse dies (designated A to D) were known The varieties being combinations of these dies. Then a 4-E variety was discovered with a new obverse and a new reverse die. Now a second example of a 4-E Lafayette dollar has been found. One of the most obvious features of the 4-E variety is that the olive branch at the base of Lafayette's statue is set a little more to the left than it is on the other varieties. This remains a very rare variety so be sure to check your Lafayette dollars. This is the common variety:

Lafayette dollar reverse

 

 

THE CHANGING METAL OF MONEY
part II: U.S. Money

    Our money started as a copy of the Spanish money already in circulation here. However we changed the fractions to parts of ten instead of pieces of eight. There was some influence of English money particularly the big copper pennies.

    Foreign coins were in circulation in America well into the 1800's. Our coins were much like them at first. As with coins around the world the metal content of our money was influenced by the market values of raw metals.

    The cent started as a large pure copper coin went to a little smaller pure copper coin then went to the copper-nickel small cent in 1856. In 1864 it went to a .95 fine copper alloyed with tin and zinc slightly smaller cent. Copper was very important for the war effort in Europe so the 1943 cent was zinc coated steel. After the war tin was left out of the alloy then in 1947 put back in then taken out again in 1962. In 1982, under the pressure of rising cost of copper, the small cent became a copper coaled zinc coin.

    Our five cent coin started as a .90 fine silver half dime in 1794. Then went lo .892 fine silver for a while then back to .90 fine silver before becoming the copper-nickel coin we know today as the nickel. With need for nickel in the second world war the metal content changed in 1942. Though we call them "war nickels" there is actually no nickel in them. They were an alloy of copper, silver, and manganese. After the war we went back to copper-nickel.

    The dime started as a .892 fine silver coin in 1796, then got smaller in 1828, then went to .90 fine silver in 1837, then got a little smaller in 1853, and, finally in 1965 it went lo the copper-nickel clad coin we know today. Quarters and halves went through the same changes.

    The American dollar started as a large .90 fine silver coin then went to .892 fine then back to .90 fine and got a little smaller. In 1849, when large amounts of gold from California came available a small gold dollar coin was issued.

California Gold Coin

    Now we have the small presidential dollars as well as bullion coins in silver, gold, and platinum and silver issues of coins in proof sets. In total American coins issued for regular circulation have gone through more than seventy changes in metal content. This information and more can be found in the Coin World Almanac - a good book for your numismatic library.


If you have the twelve key dates and mint marks of the Morgan dollar series memorized in order of their rarity...

You are probably a numismatist.

 

 

BULLET AUCTION LOT OF THE MONTH
2008 STANDARD CATALOG OF WORLD COINS

    This is the reference for all coins minted in the world from 1901 on. This is a 2230 page volume the size of a phonebook. This $55.00 book was provided to us by the Loussac Library. Money from the sale of this book will be donated to the club.

    It is in excellent condition and without spending large amounts of money for the 2009 edition this is about as current as you can get. The starting bid on this book is just $7. Foreign coins have always been the best place for kids to start collecting and with the changes in the value of the dollar they are becoming more important for adults to know. Don't miss out on this.

Krause 2008 Standard Catalog of World Coins

 

 

BEING A COIN DEALER AT A MEMBERSHIP MEETING

    First off we like our local coin dealers they are dependable, trustworthy, and knowledgeable. However when you have an extra coin or two it is good to bring it to a club meeting and pass it on to one of your fellow coin collector. At the last meeting we started selling coins from the back tables in our meeting room.

    This went well. We did not interrupt the meeting and some good coins got traded.

 

ACC Membership Meeting October 1st:

    Door Prize: 1999 Gold Plated US Coin Set won by Howard Wright.

    Membership Prize: Partial set of 50 State Quarters in Archival Quality Holder won by Paul Gabbert.

    Presentation given by Larry Nakata on the subject of "Military Payment Certificates (MPCs)".

    Some of our coin club members brought in coins with the idea of having other members buy those coins. Sort of a "Show and Sell".

    Announcement: Our coin club's Dec 11th Christmas Party will be a catered event. Stan Mead will be making arrangements with Sourdough Restaurant on the menu. We are asking our coin club members to bring a dessert, salad, or appetizer to the event as well.

 


MISNUMTCAT JUMBLE

LARDOL __________________

Last: SCRIPT - the dialog and scenes for a play - not a numismatic term. However SCRIP is a slang term for Military Payment Certificates (MPC's).

 

October 15th Board Meeting

    Called to order at 7:30 pm at the New Cauldron Restaurant located at the University Center.

    No correspondence to review.

    Discussion on December 11th Christmas Parry. Key event will be the Christmas Coin Auction. Need to have members submit their list of coins for the auction so that the lots can be posted in our club's November newsletter. Loren will post an announcement in this month's newsletter.

For our membership meeting on November 3rd, Larry Nakata will give a presentation on the subject of "Morgan Dollars".

As there was no further business to discuss, the meeting was adjourned at 8:15 pm.

BRING A LIST OF YOUR AUCTION COINS

 



ANCHORAGE COIN CLUB
RAFFLE PRIZE

1833 CAPPED BUST HALF AU-55

 

1833 CAPPED BUST HALF AU-55

tickets: $5/each, 5 tickets/$20


 

President: Jack Vinson

Vice President: Ed Vey

Secretary: Larry Nakata

Treasurer: Stan Mead

Board Member: John Larson

Board Member: Bill Hamilton

ACCent Editor: Loren Lucason

#91 Mike Orr: themoneymerchant.com

#110 Bill Fivaz: e-mail feev@webtv.net

#210 Tom Cederlind: tomcederlind.com