Return to Alaska Coin Exchange homepage

Return to ACCent homepage


ACCent: The Monthly Newsletter of the Anchorage Coin Club

ACCent Header 3


Membership Meeting 1st Wed. each month, 7 PM, Central Lutheran Church, 15th and Cordova

Vol. 23  No. 1


MEMBERSHIP MEETING JANUARY 6th, 2010
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION OF YOUR COIN COLLECTING INTERESTS


21st ANCHORAGE COIN CLUB
CHRISTMAS DINNER DECEMBER 10th

    ... and good food was had by all, and to many; a nice coin. The club's annual Christmas dinner was an excellent time to catch up with old friends as well as eat a lot of the great food they brought. Two hams and a turkey were high lights of the evening and that's all we need to say about our club's board officers. Seriously though there was more food than we could eat.

    The drawing for the raffle prizes and the coin auction were the true high lights of the evening. We sold the last few tickets for the raffle. Then after most of us were done eating we had the drawing. Way back in the beginning it was just supposed to be a high grade large size one dollar note but then we got a good deal on a trade dollar for a second prize, then a third, a fourth, and a fifth prize was added. So each ticket had five chances to win. First prize, the crisp high grade 1917 U.S. SI note, was won by Don. The 1877-S U.S. trade dollar was won by our president Jack Vinson. The three other prizes were won by Maribel, Jim, and Carl Cash.

 

1877-S Trade Dollar

 

    When we started the evening we had 56 lots in the auction. By time Carl hammered the start of bidding we had 100 lots with 4 of them being donations to the club. There was a wide range of lots in the auction. Everything from a black 1999 clad quarter said to be a commemorative of Caesar Rodney's midnight ride to vote for independence (starting bid $1) to an absolutely beautiful GSA 1883-CC deep mirror proof-like Morgan silver dollar graded by NGC MS-63 (starting bid $350).

    The largest starting bid was $750 for an 1880-O Morgan dollar graded ICG MS-65. The oddest coin was an 1846 Hamburg Germany 3 dreling; a tiny silver coin that sold for $6. Some great buys included 2 complete sets of red BU Lincoln Memorial cents from Roy's Coins.

1883-CC Morgan Silver Dollar

 

    In the end we had some happy coin sellers and some very happy coin buyers. We sold $4019 in coins and paper money to members who got early Christmas presents. After settling up with the auction the extra cookies, ham, and turkey were taken home by members and the rest of the ice cream was put in the freezer for the church. We ended the evening fatter and happier.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

GOLD AT $1100

GOLD EAGLE SALES JUMP

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you have your son's college fund invested in BU key date coins....

You are probably a numismatist

...and you should belong to the Anchorage Coin Club.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

DEC. 16th BOARD MEETING

    It was a very informal meeting starting about 7:15 pm at the New Caldron in the University Center. Board members in attendance talked of this year's past accomplishments. We also talked of coins we got at the Christmas party and how good it was to see friends and their families.

    Then we discussed our club's year 2010 agenda. Among other numismatic events and activities more coin shows are planned. The first thing planned for 2010 is finding out what you like in coin collecting and auctioning off some coins sent to us by good member Bill Fivaz. The final board meeting of 2009 concluded with your board members wishing all of you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Next board meeting; January 20th, 7pm.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

MISNUMICAT JUMBLE

SARKUE_________

Last: CHAPLENT - PLANCHET; the blank metal disk that is struck into a coin.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

WAR MONEY

    Military payment currency (MPC) is the most accessible form of money used in war time. It is for transactions between soldiers and the PX.

 

MPC Military Payment Certificate

 

    When you are at war in a foreign country you are bound to have trade going on with the locals and you do not want too much of your money in their hands. They might use it to buy weapons to use against you. And with a lot of their money in the hands of your soldiers they could manipulate the value of that money - perhaps cause inflation by dumping a lot of currency into the market.

    So to insulate against that MPC's are issued and periodically a change of scrip is called. With very little warning everyone is ordered to exchange their old MPC's for new ones. A very short time is allowed for the exchange and after that old MPC's were worthless. Perhaps that is why there are so many MPC's on the numismatic market. It is not hard to find Japanese MPCs for soldiers in China and the Philippines as well as German MPCs for soldiers in transit.

    War money is not just MPC's. After the world wars massive inflation gripped Europe and notes with extremely large value numbers on them were issued. Post world war II ten thousand Lira Italian notes are easy to find as well as a post world war 1 million mark German notes. During the American civil war small change was hard to come by so tokens were issued by private mints.

    Across the world and throughout history military money has been issued as well as money for use after the war. Mark Anthony had a mint traveling with him on his campaigns for the Roman empire in 44 B.C. They would mint gold and silver coins from their plunder to pay the legionnaires.

 

POGs

 

Now we have POG's. They are actually AAFES (Army and Air Force Exchange Service) tokens that look like game pieces from a popular game of the 1990's. They are made of thin cardboard and have a bright picture on one side.

 

AUCTION LOTS FROM BILL

 

1.18341/2c VG $35

2. 1871 1c VF 175

3. 1972-PDoub.DieObv. #8 1c MS-63 Red $20

4. 1937-D5c MS 63 28

5. 1937-D 3-Leg 5c VF-35 715

6.1943-S 25c Small S Good (rare) 10

7. 1925 Stone Mountain 50c MS-64 85

8. 1878-CC $1 VAM-6 DDO MS-60 295 (Hot 50)

9. 1886-P $1 VAM-lC (5clashmks) MS-62 (Hot 50) $35

10. 1888-O $1 VAM-4 (Hot Lips) Fine (Top 100) $75

11. St. Lib. 1 oz. .999 Silver Round 15

12. Indian 1 oz. .999 Silver Round 15

13. 1963-P 10c DDO (FS-016) ANACS MS-64 $15

14. 2008-P Proof Bald Eagle $1 28

15. 2007 Proof Pres. $1 Set (Cameo) 15

TELL US WHAT YOU WANT OUT OF COINS

 


 

 

ANCHORAGE COIN CLUB
RAFFLE PRIZE

One Dollar Legal Tender Note

 

LEGAL TENDER NOTE
FIRST PRIZE

tickets: $5/each
5 tickets/$20
27 tickets/$100

WINNING TICKET TO BE DRAWN
AT OUR CHRISTMAS DINNER IN DECEMBER


ANCHORAGE COIN CLUB OFFICERS:

President: Jack Vinson

Vice President: Ed Vey

Secretary: Larry Nakata

Treasurer: Stan Mead

Board Member: John Larson

Board Member: Bill Hamilton

ACCent Editor: Loren Lucason

#91 Mike Orr: themoneymerchant.com

#110 Bill Fivaz: e-mail feev@webtv.net

#210 Tom Cederlind: tomcederlind.com